Waiter

Waiters work where food is served, for example, in restaurants, hotels, coffee shops and steakhouses.


Waiters and waitresses work to satisfy patrons and give them the kind of attention that will make them repeat customers.  Once the customers are seated, they present menus and might suggest or recommend certain items, inform them of any specials, along with providing information about dishes. They check to make sure that the correct dinnerware and uitensils are on the table (depending on the customer's choice,) e.g. cutlery for eating fish or steak. They take customers’ food and beverage orders and serve what has been ordered. They need to make sure that customers are satisfied and that they have everything they need. Between serving customers, they clear and clean tables and counters, replenish supplies and set up table service for future customers.  When the customers are ready to leave, they calculate the bill, issue charge slips and receive the payment.Waiters are also required to keep the service area well stocked with the necessary items and, in some instances, may even help with some phases of food preparation.

The work environment depends on the type of restaurant, whether the restaurant offers a formal dining experience or a fast paced casual dining experience such as in a pizzeria, pub or family style restaurant. The work is physically demanding, as it involves carrying trays of food and drinks, working shifts which can involve late hour shifts on weekends and holidays. This work is usually hourly paid and in some cases you can earn additional money from tips. 

Some satisfying aspects of this career include:

  • getting tips from customers
  • working with people
  • being able to get a job with little education
  • being supplied with uniforms and free meals

Some demanding aspects may include:

  • being on your feet for many hours
  • limited promotional prospects
  • lifting heavy trays
  • dealing with difficult or over-demanding customers
  • waiting on large tables or a number of tables at the same time
  • irregular and sometimes very long working hours


Personal Requirements

  • enjoy working with people
  • have a ready smile and a positive attitude
  • be upbeat and always ready to pesent specials and offer service to clients
  • good communication skills (especially listening skills)
  • able to multi-task by working multiple tables at the same time
  • able to cope under pressure.


How to Enter

School Subjects

No specific requirements. 


What to Study

The waiter learns the occupation mainly through on-the-job training.  
Short courses are offered by the Hospitality Industries' Training Board, at most TVET Colleges.

Waiters learn the required skills by on-the-job training. Short courses are offered by the Hospitality Industries’ Training Board. 


Employment

  • Restaurants and cafeterias 
  • Steakhouses 
  • Hotel and motel dining rooms 
  • Private clubs 
  • Other establishments that serve food


Further Information

  • try to obtain vacation or part-time work as a waiter
  • speak to waiters about this type of work and ask permission to observe them at work
  • though waitering does not typically require a formal qualification, there are some skills that can be learned on the job relating to serving and good customer service practice.


Getting Started

  • try to obtain vacation or part-time work as a waiter
  • speak to waiters about this type of work and ask permission to observe them at work
  • though waitering does not typically require a formal qualification, there are some skills that can be learned on the job relating to serving and good customer service practice.


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