Glass Instrument Maker

Glass instrument makers manufacture and repair glass appliances and instruments for use by scientists and researchers in experiments.


They manufacture scientific apparatus according to the specifications of the scientist requiring the apparatus, or according to standard specifications. Other specifications are usually given in the form of a sketch. Sometimes glass instrument makers design the instruments themselves.

The work of glass instrument makers involves the bending and forming of glass tubes, the blowing of reactor valves and the forming of gas waste-pipes, the partial machining of basic glass components and taps, as well as the mounting of such components by melting them together to form a complete apparatus. They make use of various techniques in the formation of glass components.


How to Enter

Grade 9, or 10 Certificate, or N1 is recommended.


 


What to Study

There are 3 ways to qualify as a registered artisan:

1. An apprenticeship is a fixed contract between company and apprentice, ranging in duration from between 18 months and 4 years. At the end of the contract, the apprentice writes a trade test leading to professional certification.

2. A learnership is a structured learning programme ranging from about a year to 3 years. A learnership comprises theoretical and practical training. Practical training is conducted on site (on the premises of the organisation). This has the advantage that the learner gets experience whilst training.

3. TVET colleges offer theoretical training to prospective artisans via the new National Certificate Vocational (NCV). During this 3-year programme (levels 2 to 4), learners complete a school-leaving certificate (NCV) similar to the new National Senior Certificate (NSC) in schools. They are also exposed to a practical workshop component.

All learners are required to complete a practical internship under the supervision of an experienced artisan. As an alternative to doing the full qualification, a learner can apply to do a skills programme at a TVET College. Skills programmes are short practical hands-on courses.
For more information about qualifications and skills programmes, contact your nearest TVET College. TVET Colleges are accredited and funded by a SETA (Sector Education and Training Authority) such as MerSETA or ChietaSETA. They also receive bursary funding through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the NCV programme.

All learners are required to complete a practical internship under the supervision of an experienced artisan. As an alternative to doing the full qualification, learner can apply to do a skills programme at an TVET College. Skills programmes are short practical hands on courses.

For more information about qualifications and skills programmes, contact your nearest TVET College. TVET Colleges are accredited and funded by a SETA such as MerSETA or ChietaSETA. The also receive bursary funding through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the NCV programme.


Employment


  • contractors and home-builders

  • businesses that do their own construction and alterations

  • manufacturing and mining concerns

  • insurance companies

  • vehicle repair shops

  • self-employed


Further Information

CetaSETA (Construction Education Training Authority)
P O Box 1955
Halfway House, 1685
Tel: (011) 265-5900 Fax: (011) 265-5924/5
www.ceta.org.za

BIFSA Head Office
Construction Park
234 Alexandra Avenue
Midrand
P O Box 1619
Halfway House, 1685
Tel: (011) 205-9000
www.ci-net.co.za


Getting Started


  • do volunteer or part-time work as an assistant to a glazier

  • speak to a glazier about this career and ask permission to observe him at work


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